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Buy Asheville Land for Sale – 3 Factors to Consider

The Top 3 Factors to Consider When You Decide to Purchase Asheville Land for Sale

Location: When you start to consider buying land, you want to look at the short-term (what do I want to do with this property?) and the long-term (could it be re-sold?).
Unless you’re buying a homestead for your family’s future generations, this long-term question doesn’t indicate lack of commitment – it lends itself to the notion that you will improve upon this property through your stewardship and may someday move on. For the short-term question, it’s important to consider zoning (e.g. you can’t establish your cob oven distribution center if the region is zoned for agriculture). Consider land value in the surrounding region – for example, acreage in Buncombe County, drawing on its proximity to Asheville, is considerably more expensive than the land for sale in Madison County. An important question many of our clients ask themselves as they investigate different locations is, “Can I be self-sufficient on this land given my surroundings?”

Topography: Traditionally, the higher into the hills, the more pricey the property because of Asheville’s killer views and explosive mountain sunsets.
However, as the post-recession market emerges, pragmatism is taking precedence over altitude – buyers want to utilize the land efficiently, which isn’t always easy when your home is dangling off a cliff. So gradient is one factor, and so is the direction. Do you want Eastern sun for fruitful harvests, or perhaps a North-facing property might be nice for cooler summers until you head South for the winter. Such factors create subtle but significant dynamics that should influence your decision when looking at land for sale around Asheville.

Price: LandCrazy real estate agents have one major point of advice when it comes to price: Don’t overpay.
Overpaying for a property is what trapped us in the doomed real estate bubble the first time around. Buying land for sale, especially around Asheville, is a waiting game in which you mustn’t let your emotions take over your rationale (they should work together). Take the example of an auction – you have a figure in your head for the mounted jackalope (why you need one is a conversation between you and your partner, but that’s beside the point). As soon as the bidding for the mythical wall mount goes over your mental limit, you put your little auction fan/card down and you walk away. The land is the same game and necessitates the same willpower, patience, and smarts.